Today in Labor History

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Archive for the tag “a. philip randolph”

May 16, 1979

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Labor leader and civil rights activist A. Philip Randolph dies. In 1925, Randolph helped to found the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and led the union’s twelve-year fight for recognition as the bargaining agent for porters working at the Pullman Company. “Salvation for a race, nation or class must come from within. Freedom is never granted; it is won. Justice is never given; it is exacted.”

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April 15, 1889

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Labor leader and civil rights activist A. Philip Randolph is born. In 1925, Randolph helped to found the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and led the union’s twelve-year fight for recognition as the bargaining agent for porters working at the Pullman Company. “Salvation for a race, nation or class must come from within. Freedom is never granted; it is won. Justice is never given; it is exacted.”

August 28, 1963

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250,000 people participate in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in Washington, D.C.  The march—initiated by A. Philip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters—was organized by a coalition of civil rights, labor, and religious organizations.  It was here that Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.

June 18, 1941

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Union leader A. Philip Randolph meets with President Franklin Roosevelt about the demonstration being organized for July 1 to protest discrimination in the military and defense industries.  Randolph told the president that 100,000 people were planning to march on Washington, D.C., and Roosevelt issued Executive Order 8802:  “There shall be no discrimination in the employment of workers in defense industries or government because of race, creed, color, or national origin.”

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