Today in Labor History

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Archive for the tag “boston”

January 15, 1919

molasses-tank-kills-many

A 58 ft. high metal tank, 90 ft. in diameter, filled with 2.5 million gallons of crude molasses bursts in Boston, and the explosion sends a 40 ft. tall tidal wave of molasses and debris crashing down Commercial Street. What became known as the Boston Molasses Flood killed 21 workers and residents and injured another 150. After many years of litigation, the United States Industrial Alcohol Company was eventually found culpable and forced to pay a million dollar settlement.

August 21, 1919

Boston Police Strike

In defiance of the Police Commissioner’s issuance of an order barring officers from being in a union, 800 Boston police officers meet to install the officers of their newly-formed local. After the Commissioner began firing union leaders, police officers voted 1,134 to 2 to strike and on September 9, most of the Boston police department walked off the job.

January 15, 1919

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A 58-foot-high metal tank, 90 feet in diameter, filled with 2.5 million gallons of crude molasses bursts in Boston, and the explosion sends a 40-foot tall tidal wave of molasses and debris crashing down Commercial Street. What became known as the Boston Molasses Flood killed 21 workers and residents and injured another 150. After many years of litigation, the United States Industrial Alcohol Company was eventually found culpable and forced to pay a million-dollar settlement.

September 9, 1919

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1,100 Boston Police Department officers go out on strike over union recognition, wages, and working conditions. Governor Calvin Coolidge called out the entire state militia and used his authority to fire everyone on strike, replacing almost the entire department with soldiers recently returned from World War I – at higher wages and with better working conditions.

March 9, 1902

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Rail and ship freight workers begin a sympathy strike with striking freight handlers and clerks in Boston who had walked out over their co-workers being fired for refusing to handle freight by a company using scab labor to replace union freight drivers.  Within three days, 20,000 freight workers were on strike in the city and the dispute was quickly settled.

September 9, 1919

Image1,100 Boston Police Department officers go out on strike over union recognition, wages, and working conditions.  Governor Calvin Coolidge called out the entire state militia and used his authority to fire everyone on strike, replacing almost the entire department with soldiers recently returned from World War I – at higher wages and with better working conditions.

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