Today in Labor History

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Archive for the tag “boycott”

September 8, 1965

blood-on-grapesFilipino American grape workers walk out on strike against Delano, California, table and wine grape growers, protesting years of poor pay and working conditions. Latino farm workers soon joined them, and the strike and subsequent boycott lasted more than five years. In 1970, growers signed their first union contracts with the United Farm Workers union, which included better pay, benefits, and protections.

December 4, 1970

03-boycott-lettuce-1972-susan-due-pearcyFollowing an injunction against the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee and Cesar Chavez, specifically, around picketing lettuce grower Bud Antle during the Salinas Valley farmworkers’ strike, Chavez refuses to call off the boycott and is arrested. Chavez was jailed for two weeks until the California Supreme Court ordered his release.

May 9, 1972

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4,000 garment workers at Farah Manufacturing Company in El Paso go out on strike over union representation. In January 1974, after a successful national boycott, the NLRB ruled in the workers’ favor, and the company finally recognized the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. The 1974 contract included pay increases, job security and seniority rights, and a grievance procedure.

September 16, 2004

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The Farm Labor Organizing Committee signs a collective bargaining agreement with Mt. Olive Pickle Company and its growers, ending a successful five-year long nationwide boycott. The contract – which covered workers on more than 1,000 North Carolina farms who had previously been paid piece rate and worked and lived under deplorable conditions – marked the first time a U.S. labor union represented guest workers.

July 22, 1887

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Brewers and brewery workers in San Francisco sign their first collective bargaining agreement, bringing to a close a strike and successful boycott which had lasted several months. The agreement included a closed shop, sick leave, a 10-hour day, minimum wages, overtime pay, and “free beer in moderation while at work.”

May 29, 1996

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The United Farm Workers and Bruce Church, Inc. — the nation’s third largest lettuce grower — reach an agreement on a contract, ending seventeen years of boycotts, litigation, and conflict.

April 30, 1963

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Inspired by the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a group of West Indians in Bristol, England, organize a boycott of the Bristol Omnibus Company for its refusal to employ non-white workers on its buses. The boycott lasted for four months until the company reversed its discriminatory hiring practice.

September 16, 2004

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The Farm Labor Organizing Committee signs a collective bargaining agreement with Mt. Olive Pickle Company and its growers, ending a successful five-year long nationwide boycott.  The contract – which covered workers on more than 1,000 North Carolina farms who had previously been paid piece rate and worked and lived under deplorable conditions – marked the first time a U.S. labor union represented guest workers.

July 29, 1970

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After five years of strikes and boycotts, table grape growers in California sign their first collective bargaining agreement with the United Farm Workers.  The contract—which covered over 10,000 workers—ended labor contracting and established seniority and hiring rights; included an immediate wage increase; and provided for fresh water and toilets in the fields, and a medical plan.

July 22, 1887

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Brewers and brewery workers in San Francisco sign their first collective bargaining agreement, bringing to a close a strike and successful boycott which had lasted several months.  The agreement included a closed shop, sick leave, a 10-hour day, minimum wages, overtime pay, and “free beer in moderation while at work.”

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