Today in Labor History

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Archive for the tag “flsa”

October 13, 2015

homrcareHome care workers are finally getting protections they should have had years ago. After a U.S. Court of Appeals unanimously upheld a Department of Labor Home Care Final Rule to extend minimum wage and overtime protections to almost 2 million home care workers, the ruling is effective as of today, October 13, 2015.

June 25, 1938

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President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) into law. The FLSA applied to industries whose combined employment represented only about one-fifth of the labor force. In these industries, it banned certain types of child labor, established a minimum wage, and set a maximum workweek at 44 hours.

June 10, 1946

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The United States Supreme Court rules on Anderson et al. v. Mt. Clemens Pottery Co. – also known as the “portal-to-portal” case – finding that preliminary work activities, where controlled by the employer and performed entirely for the employer’s benefit, are considered working time under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  In 1947, Congress enacted the Portal-to-Portal Act to amend the FLSA in light of the court’s ruling.

February 3, 1941

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The Supreme Court of the United States rules unanimously in United States v. Darby to uphold the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which banned certain types of child labor, established a minimum wage, and set a maximum workweek at 44 hours.

October 24, 1940

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The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938’s mandate of a 40-hour work week with time-and-a half overtime pay for hours of work beyond that goes into effect.  The legislation was passed to eliminate “labor conditions detrimental to the maintenance of the minimum standard of living necessary for health, efficiency, and the general well-being of workers.”

June 25, 1938

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President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) into law. The FLSA applied to industries whose combined employment represented only about one-fifth of the labor force.  In these industries, it banned certain types of child labor, established a minimum wage, and set a maximum workweek at 44 hours.

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