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February 13, 1913

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After West Virginia Governor William E. Glasscock declares martial law to put down the coal miners’ strike in in Kanawha county, 83-year old activist and organizer Mary Harris “Mother” Jones is arrested. She was tried and convicted by a military court and sentenced to twenty years in prison. “Whatever I have done in West Virginia,” she said, “I have done it all over the United States. And when I get out, I will do it again.” She was released and pardoned after serving 85 days.

February 13, 1913

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After West Virginia Governor William E. Glasscock declares martial law to put down the coal miners’ strike in in Kanawha county, 83-year old activist and organizer Mary Harris “Mother” Jones is arrested.  She was tried and convicted by a military court and sentenced to twenty years in prison.  “Whatever I have done in West Virginia,” she said, “I have done it all over the United States.  And when I get out, I will do it again.”  She was released and pardoned after serving 85 days.

September 30, 1899

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Mother Jones organizes the wives of striking miners in Arnot, Pennsylvania, to descend on the mine with brooms and mops and clanging pots and pans.  “I told the men to stay home with the children for a change and let the women attend to the scabs.”  The women frightened away the mules and their scab drivers and returned daily to keep watch.  The miners eventually won their strike.

July 7, 1903

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Mary Harris “Mother” Jones begins the “Children’s Crusade.”  Accompanied by child mine and mill workers, she walked from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to President Theodore Roosevelt’s home in New York state to protest the plight of child laborers.

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