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Archive for the tag “pullman”

May 11, 1894

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With their wages slashed and no reduction in rent at the company housing, Pullman Palace Car Company factory workers walk off the job. The workers sought the support of the American Railway Union, which gave notice in June that its members would no longer work trains that included Pullman cars. The strike and boycott crippled railway traffic nationwide and at its peak involved 250,000+ workers in 27 states.

August 25, 1925

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Pullman porters – fed up with working long hours for little pay and no job security – form the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in New York City.  It would be another twelve years before the union signed its first collective bargaining agreement with the Pullman Company.

June 26, 1894

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In solidarity with striking Pullman workers, members of the American Railway Union, led by Eugene V. Debs, refuse to run trains that include Pullman cars.  By June 29, over 125,000 workers on 29 railroads had joined the boycott.

May 11, 1894

Image

With their wages slashed and no reduction in rent at the company housing, Pullman Palace Car Company factory workers walk off the job.  The workers sought the support of the American Railway Union, which gave notice in June that its members would no longer work trains that included Pullman cars.  The strike and boycott crippled railway traffic nationwide and at its peak involved 250,000+ workers in 27 states.

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