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Archive for the tag “slavery”

February 14, 1818

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Abolitionist Frederick Douglass is born into slavery in Talbot County on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The exact date of his birth is unknown, but Douglass chose to celebrate February 14 as his birthdate. “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will.”

December 2, 1859

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Having been found guilty of murder, treason, and inciting slave insurrection, abolitionist John Brown is hanged in Charlestown, Virginia. Frederick Douglass said of John Brown: “His zeal in the cause of my race was far greater than mine – it was as the burning sun to my taper light – mine was bounded by time, his stretched away to the boundless shores of eternity. I could live for the slave, but he could die for him.”

March 2, 1807

3.2.13President Thomas Jefferson signs into law the Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves. It provided heavy penalties for slave traders and ended large-scale importations of slaves into the United States. But it did nothing to undermine the legitimacy of holding men and women in bondage, and the importation of slaves continued, albeit illegally.

October 2, 1800

Nat-turnerNat Turner is born into slavery in Southampton County, Virginia. In 1831, Turner led a slave revolt, freeing slaves and killing white men, women, and children, before being captured by militia, tried, and hanged. The state reimbursed the slaveholders for their slaves; in the aftermath, close to 200 black people, many of whom had nothing to do with the rebellion, were murdered by white mobs.

May 30, 1741

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Accusations, arrests, and trials are underway in New York City following a series of fires that broke out after a winter of economic hardship and fears of a slave uprising by white colonists. By the time the witch-hunt that became known as the New York Slave Conspiracy ended, 30 people had been hanged or burned at the stake.

February 14, 1818

ImageAbolitionist Frederick Douglass is born into slavery in Talbot County on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The exact date of his birth is unknown, but Douglass chose to celebrate February 14 as his birthdate.  “Power concedes nothing without a demand.  It never did and it never will.”

January 8, 1811

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The largest slave revolt in U.S. history begins on Louisiana’s German Coast sugar plantations.  Armed primarily with hand tools, the men marched toward New Orleans, setting plantations and crops on fire and adding to their numbers as they went.  The uprising of an estimated 300-500 people lasted for two days before it was brutally suppressed by the military. 

December 2, 1859

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Having been found guilty of murder, treason, and inciting slave insurrection, abolitionist John Brown is hanged in Charlestown, Virginia.  Frederick Douglass said of John Brown:  “His zeal in the cause of my race was far greater than mine – it was as the burning sun to my taper light – mine was bounded by time, his stretched away to the boundless shores of eternity.  I could live for the slave, but he could die for him.”

October 16, 1859

ImageAbolitionist John Brown leads 18 men in an attack on the Harpers Ferry armory.  The raid to seize the weapons failed and Brown was captured, tried, and hung.  At his trial, Brown said:  “Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice, and mingle my blood…with the blood of millions in this slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments, I submit; so let it be done!”

August 21, 1831

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Nat Turner begins a slave revolt in Southampton County, Virginia.  The two-day insurrection left at least 55 white people dead.  Turner hid for several months, but was eventually captured and executed, along with over 50 of his followers; another 200 black people were subsequently murdered by white mobs in the state.

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