Today in Labor History

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Archive for the tag “wisconsin”

February 16, 2011

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Public schools in Madison close after teachers call in sick to protest Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s bill that would strip the state’s 175,000 public employees of their collective bargaining rights.

April 2, 2011

002_RBI-image-JOC043821I02Canadian and American trade unionists rally at the international border between British Columbia and Washington to show their solidarity with public sector workers in Wisconsin facing attacks by that state’s government. The action was organized in conjunction with hundreds of other We Are One rallies that took place throughout North America.

October 21, 1933

24Th Of May 1933.Wisconsin. American Farmers StrikeIn an attempt to raise the price of milk, Wisconsin dairy farmers begin the third major milk strike of the year in the state. During the Great Depression, farmers who produced milk for bottling were able to remain solvent, but those who produced milk for cheese, butter, and other uses were driven into poverty.

May 3, 1911

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Wisconsin enacts the nation’s first state constitutional Workmen’s Compensation Act, guaranteeing injury compensation as a legal right. The constitutionality of the Act was upheld by the Wisconsin Supreme Court on November 1 (and by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1926).

February 16, 2011

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Public schools in Madison close after teachers call in sick to protest Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s bill that would strip the state’s 175,000 public employees of their collective bargaining rights.

January 28, 1932

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Wisconsin Governor Philip LaFollette signs the nation’s first unemployment compensation law.  [Photo:  Also pictured in back, left to right – Henry Oltl, President, Wisconsin Federation of Labor; Elizabeth Brandeis; Paul Raushenbush; John R. Commons; Henry Huber; Lt. Governor Harold Groves; and Assemblyman Robert Nixon.]

May 5, 1886

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After four days of massive 8-hour day demonstrations throughout Milwaukee, WI, 1,500 workers take their demand to the Bay View Rolling Mills, the area’s largest manufacturer.  When they approached the mill, they were fired on by state militia, who had been called out by the governor.  Seven died, including a 13-year-old boy.

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