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Archive for the tag “woody guthrie”

February 23, 1940

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Woody Guthrie writes “This Land Is Your Land” following a trip hitchhiking and riding the rails from California to New York. It was a musical response to Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America”: “We can’t just bless America, we’ve got to change it.”

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July 14, 1912

A mural of Woody Guthrie with the title of his most famous song emblazoned across the top guides visitors to the Woody Guthrie Center in downtown Tulsa

Folk singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie is born in Okemah, Oklahoma. Author of “This Land Is Your Land,” “Worried Man Blues,” “Union Maid,” and other American classics, Woody crisscrossed the nation, living and singing among the dispossessed during the Great Depression.

October 3, 1967

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Folk singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie dies at the age of 55 from complications due to Huntington’s disease. Many of Guthrie’s songs were born from his experiences and his travels with migrant workers during the Great Depression. “I am out to sing songs that will prove to you that this is your world,” he said. “I am out to sing songs that make you take pride in yourself and your work.”

October 3, 1967

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Folk singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie dies at the age of 55 from complications due to Huntington’s disease.  Many of Guthrie’s songs were born from his experiences and his travels with migrant workers during the Great Depression.  “I am out to sing songs that will prove to you that this is your world,” he said.  “I am out to sing songs that make you take pride in yourself and your work.”

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